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Thursday, January 28, 2016

POSTPONED: NLM History of Medicine Lecture

Due to the extensive difficulties in travel following the record-breaking snow-fall in the Washington, DC area, the NLM History of Medicine lecture by Eric Boyle, originally scheduled for Thursday, January 28, has been postponed.

Thursday, January 21, 2016

NLM History of Medicine Lecture



Dear Colleagues,
 
You are cordially invited to the next NLM History of Medicine lecture, to be held on Thursday, January 28, from 2 pm to 3pm in the NLM Lister Hill Auditorium, Building 38A, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.  Eric W. Boyle, PhD, Chief Archivist of the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Silver Spring, MD, will speak on "In the Belly of the Beast: A History of Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health."

The story begins in earnest in 1991, when a Senate Appropriations Committee responsible for the budget of the National Institutes of Health reported that it was not satisfied that the mainstream medical community had fully explored the potential of unconventional medical practices. In response, Congress mandated the creation of an office to investigate, evaluate, and validate unconventional health care systems and practices. The original Office for the Study of Unconventional Medical Practices, which eventually became the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) sought to obtain and disseminate knowledge about alternative medicine to practitioners and the public. But as one advocate of alternative medicine noted at a strategic planning session in September 2009, the challenges of studying complementary and alternative medicine at the NIH might be likened to working "in the belly of the beast." While skeptics have doubted the feasibility of this kind of research, practitioner-advocates have persistently warned about the dangers of alternative medicine being swallowed whole by the research behemoth. The central questions in this talk are how did the NIH meet its multifaceted mandate, and how did it tackle the challenges of investigating the field while addressing the priorities and demands of its harshest critics and most sympathetic supporters?

This presentation is co-sponsored by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, and the Office of NIH History.

All are welcome.
 
Sign language interpretation is provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate may contact Stephen Greenberg at 301-435-4995, e-mail greenbes@mail.nih.gov, or the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).
 
Due to current security measures at NIH, off-campus visitors are advised to consult the NLM Visitors and Security website:
 
 
Sponsored by:
NLM's History of Medicine Division
Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief
 
Event contact:
Stephen J. Greenberg, MSLS, PhD
Coordinator of Public Services
History of Medicine Division
National Library of Medicine, NIH
 
 
 

Friday, October 16, 2015

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Friday, August 21, 2015

NMHM to move under Defense Health Agency

This largely restores the status quo of pre-BRAC when the Museum reported through the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology to the Under Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs.






3 US Organizations Set To Join Defense Health Agency
NMHM was founded as the Army Medical Museum in 1862 and is home to a National Historic Landmark collection of more than 25 million objects.









Thursday, August 6, 2015

Robert Osborn-illustrated booklet online

The Navy's BUMED's Office of Medical History has put its 4000th item online at the Medical Heritage Library. It's Vertigo Sense, illustrated by cartoonist Robert Osborn.

Read it at https://archive.org/details/VertigoSense

Thursday, June 25, 2015

National Library of Medicine historian Michael Sappol on WWII animation

The Inside Story

  on June 25, 2015

By Michael Sappol

Inside Out, Pixar's latest hit animated feature, is mainly set on the inside of a young girl's brain. Riley, an eleven-year-old, is operated by a committee of characters, each representing an emotion, who collectively try to deal with her troubles at school and home. It seems like a very contemporary way to depict consciousness, and critical reaction from psychologists and neuroscientists has been largely favorable.

Title frame from The Iside Story, featuring a sailors face and depictions of him from various stages of childhood.But, strangely, the film echoes an older and quite obscure piece of animated cartooning: a 1944 movie made during wartime for the U.S. Coast Guard, The Inside Story. That film, now preserved in the historical audiovisual collection of the National Library of Medicine, deals with the typical emotional problems suffered by men entering the military service and argues that psychotherapeutic approaches may help.

Continued at http://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2015/06/25/the-inside-story/

Sunday, June 21, 2015

Civil War medicine by National Library of Medicine historians




Six Ways the Civil War Changed American Medicine

150 years ago, the historic conflict forced doctors to get creative and to reframe the way they thought about medicine


A ward in Carver Hospital in Washington, D.C., during the Civil War. One key innovation during this period was the division of hospitals into wards based on disease. (U.S. National Archives)


Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Buffalo medical museum featured on tv

Fascinating, strange collection to discover at UB's Medical Museum

June 3: Civil War medicine presentation at National Archives


Wednesday, June 3, at 2 p.m.
William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
Civil War Medicine & Surgery

Archives specialist Rebecca Sharp will discuss The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, 1861-1865. This published source contains information about Civil War medical and surgical procedures as well as case studies. Video | Captioning | Presentation slides | Handout 1 | Handout 2.

 http://www.archives.gov/dc-metro/events/june.html


Thursday, May 14, 2015

Fwd: [caduceus-l] CFP: A Medical History of the Vietnam War

 On March 10-12, 2016, the Vietnam Center and Archive at Texas Tech University, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage will be co-sponsoring a conference on the medical history of the Vietnam War. This two-day conference will be hosted at the Doubletree Hotel, San Antonio, Texas.
Presentations on all facets of medicine and healthcare related to the Vietnam War are welcome to include historical understandings of military medicine as practiced by all participants and in all geographic regions, the repercussions of the war on the practice of medicine, medicine in various campaigns, medical care outside of Vietnam, effects on the home front, postwar medical issues, mental health issues, and related topics.

Conference organizers welcome both individual presentation proposals as well as preorganized panel proposals that include two to three presentations. Conference sessions will
follow the standard 90 minute format to include one hour for presentations and 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Presentations by veterans are especially encouraged as are presentations by graduate students. All of the conference organizers are partners with the Department of Defense's Vietnam War Commemoration. In keeping with that partnership, there will be a dignified event to thank veterans for their service.

Proposal submission deadline is October 31, 2015. Please send a 250 word abstract and separate two-page CV/resume to steve.maxner@ttu.edu. If submitting a panel proposal, please include separate abstracts for each proposed presentation and CVs/resumes for each speaker.

Thank you for your interest in participating in this conference.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Dick Mulvaney's polio vaccination campaign remembered

Dick Mulvaney used to volunteer at the National Museum of Health and Medicine. He was the first to vaccinate against polio in Northern Virginia and the Post has a story about him.

A '50s children's crusade, aka Amid debate about vaccines, polio remembered as a scourge defeated

By T. Rees Shapiro

Washington Post April 22 2015

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/amid-debate-about-vaccines-polio-is-remembered-as-a-scourge-defeated/2015/04/21/0d9d9476-e21d-11e4-81ea-0649268f729e_story.html


Monday, April 20, 2015

Morton's Medical Bibliography, Fifth Edition (Garrison-Morton), is now freely available online


From: Jeremy Norman

We are pleased to announce that Morton's Medical Bibliography, Fifth Edition (Garrison-Morton), is now available as an interactive database at HistoryofMedicine.com. This standard reference work for the history of medicine, biology, and dentistry was originated by Fielding H. Garrison, and expanded and revised through four editions by Leslie T. Morton. It was further revised and expanded by Jeremy M. Norman for the fifth edition. The fifth edition, published in 1991, and the last edition in book form, contained nearly 9000 entries, most of which were annotated. The new revised web version, offered free of charge, incorporates interactive features and other enhancements which significantly improve usability.


Jeremy Norman
HistoryofScience.com
HistoryofMedicine.com
HistoryofInformation.com
BookHistory.net
Jeremy Norman & Co., Inc.
 
Mail: P.O. Box 867
Novato, CA 94948
 
UPS, FedEx, DHL:
936-B Seventh St., PMB 238
Novato, CA 94945-3010


Thursday, April 16, 2015

AMEDD Historian #10 out now

Welcome to the another issue of the "AMEDD Historian;" an electronic

history journal designed to bring you articles and pictures on Army Medicine

history.  We want your contributions so if you have an idea for an Army

Medicine historical article, please write it up and submit it to us in the

electronic address in the "AMEDD Historian." 

 

The "AMEDD Historian" will be published 4 times per year (quarterly),

so we'll need your input NLT 1 Mar, 7 Jun, 6 Sep.  This journal will be

success with your contributions and I look forward to receiving your

articles on our proud heritage.

 

Here is the link:

http://history.amedd.army.mil/newsletters/AMEDD_history_newsletterNo10.pdf.

 

 

 

ROBERT S. DRISCOLL

Command Historian and

Chief, AMEDD Center of History and Heritage

US Army Medical Command

2748 Worth Road, Ste 48

Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-6003