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Wednesday, April 5, 2017

April 6: Stephen Greenberg on WWI medical photography

World War I Centenary Forum: The Frances Dupuy Fletcher Photo Album

Stephen J. Greenberg, will speak at 2 PM ET on April 6 in the NLM Lister Hill Auditorium on "The Frances Dupuy Fletcher Photo Album" as part of the Library's World War I Centenary Forum. Circulating Now interviewed him about his work.

The 2017 Spurgeon Neel Award

The Army Medical Department Museum Foundation is pleased to sponsor the 2017 Spurgeon Neel Annual Award competition for the article of 5000 words or less that best exemplifies the history, legacy, and traditions of the Army Medical Department.

Named in honor of Major General (Retired) Spurgeon H. Neel, first Commanding General of Health Services Command (now U.S. Army Medical Command), the award competition is open to all federal employees, military and civilian, as well as non-governmental civilian authors who submit manuscripts for publishing consideration.

The AMEDD Museum Foundation will present a special medallion award and a $1000 monetary prize to the winner, who will be notified in advance, at a Foundation-sponsored event early in 2018.

All manuscripts must be submitted to the AMEDD Museum Foundation, amedd.foundation@att.net, by 30 September 2017. At the time of submission, a manuscript must be original work and not pending publication in any other periodical. It must conform to the Writing and Submission Guidance of the AMEDD Journal, and must relate to the history, legacy and/or traditions of the Army Medical Department. Manuscripts will be reviewed and evaluated by a six-member committee appointed by the President of the AMEDD Museum Foundation. The winning manuscript will be selected no later than December 2017.

Additional detail concerning the Spurgeon Neel Annual Award may be obtained by contacting Mrs. Sue McMasters at the AMEDD Museum Foundation, 210-226-0265.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

April 6: Sarah Eilers speaks on WWI facial reconstruction

World War I Centenary Forum: Masking Devastation

by Circulating Now

Sarah Eilers, will speak at 2 PM ET on April 6 in the NLM Lister Hill Auditorium on "Masking Devastation: Inside Anna Ladd's Paris Studio" as part of the Library's World War I Centenary Forum. Circulating Now interviewed her about her work.


Circulating Now: Please tell us a little about yourself. Where are you from? What do you do? What is your typical workday like?

The original film she discusses is at the National Museum of Health and Medicine, since the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology no longer exists. See the rest of the interview at https://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2017/04/04/world-war-i-centenary-forum-masking-devastation/



Thursday, March 16, 2017

New York Academy of Medicine archivist featured online

St. Elizabeths hospital exhibit at National Building Museum

Architecture of an Asylum: St Elizabeths 1852-2017
MARCH 25, 2017–JANUARY 15, 2018
http://nbm.org/exhibition/architecture-asylum-st-elizabeths-1852-2017/

I'm sure this will be a good exhibit and I plan to go see it. The hospital treated mentally-ill soldiers for much of the nineteenth century and there's a Civil War graveyard on the site.

St. Elizabeths had a historic collection, or museum, that was broken up in the 1990s with material going to the National Archives, the National Museum of Health and Medicine, Howard University, and at least two other places.

Here's the Medical Museum's description of its holdings:

SAINT ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL COLLECTION, 1861-1990
No finding aid,21 boxes, unarranged, inactive, unrestricted.
Material transferred when Saint Elizabeth's closed its museum due to being transferred from the federal government to the District of Columbia. Includes books, photographs,paintings, patient art, certificates, and pamphlets. Most photographs and paintings are portraits of staff. Objects also in Historical Collections.
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Additional material transferred to the National Portrait Gallery, National Museum of American History, Howard University,Department of the Interior Museum, Department of Health and Human Services' SAMSUS, Smithsonian Institution Castle, National Archives, and the Octagon House.

The Octagon House is the architects society's museum and it got a large model of the hospital (over my objections).

Here's a short piece from the Washington City Paper on some of the Medical Museum's holdings:

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

March 21: Shelley McKellar speaks on artificial hearts at NLM

[I saw a much earlier version of this research, and recommend this].

You are cordially invited to the next NLM History of Medicine lecture, to be held on Tuesday, March 21, from 2pm to 3:30pm in the NLM Lister Hill Auditorium, Building 38A, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.  This special program will be the first annual NLM Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine. This is a new annual lecture at the NLM which honors the legacy of Michael E. DeBakey as it exists in modern medical practice and in the ongoing public service of the NLM.

This year, there will be two speakers at this inaugural event:

"'Intentional Impact' The Legacy of Michael E. DeBakey Beyond the Operating Room"
Shelley McKellar, PhD, The Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Medicine, Associate Professor, with Joint Appointment with the Department of Surgery, Western University, Canada

"A Brief Look at Michael E. DeBakey's Role in Establishing the National Library of Medicine as It Is Today"
George P. Noon, MD, Professor of Surgery, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine

The NLM Michael E. DeBakey Lecture in the History of Medicine is supported by a generous gift to the NLM by the Michael E. DeBakey Medical Foundation
This lecture will be live-streamed globally, and subsequently archived, by NIH VideoCasting:


All are welcome.

Sign language interpretation is provided. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodation to participate may contact Stephen Greenberg at 301-827-4577, e-mail stephen.greenberg@nih.gov, or via the Federal Relay (1-800-877-8339).

In addition, we warmly welcome you to visit our blog, "Circulating Now," where you can learn more about the collections and related programs of the History of Medicine Division of the NLM:

Here also you can read interviews with previous lecturers:

Due to current security measures at NIH, off-campus visitors are advised to consult the NLM Visitors and Security website:

Sponsored by:
NLM's History of Medicine Division
Jeffrey S. Reznick, PhD, Chief

Event contact:
Stephen J. Greenberg, MSLS, PhD
Section Head, Rare Books & Early Manuscripts
History of Medicine Division
National Library of Medicine, NIH
301-827-4577
stephen.greenberg@nih.gov

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Aug 20: Stanley Burns speaks at new Gettysburg PA medical museum


From: Stanley Burns

I will be giving the inaugural address at the opening of a new Civil War medical museum in Gettysburg, at the The Daniel Lady Farm. The farm and Barn was a Confederate staging area during the battle and now will be dedicated as part a new medical museum. I will be lecturing and also supervising an amputation. There will be re-enactors for various events.

The Daniel Lady farm on July 2, 1863  served as a staging area for Major General Edward Johnson's divisions of Confederate regiments for the attack on the Union Flank at Culps Hill. The farm was converted to a field hospital by July 3rd for seriously wounded Confederates who were then left at the hospital as the Confederates retreated south after the battle.

I will be lecturing on the amazing medical photographs of wounded soldiers taken by Dr Reed Brockway Bontecou, Surgeon-In-Charge of Harewood US Army General Hospital Washington DC, as well as my work as the on set medical consultant to PBS's Civil War drama, Mercy Street.