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Sunday, March 22, 2009

We're stunningly popular?

Ok, people are suddenly reading this blog from all over the world. Can you tell us in the comments how you found us and why you're checking it out? We went from about 100 views a day to 290 views an hour today.

Thanks!

Mike the archivist

46 comments:

Anonymous said...

you are linked in an austrian news site
the most popular one

think!! said...

Jep, found you over the same source. like Anonymous.

Anonymous said...

same here, found you through www.orf.at
(Austrian TV, news website)

Anonymous said...

I found yr link at www.orf.at (Vienna, Austria)

Anonymous said...

i followed same link
your in the news because of the work of Rhode

schreibse said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

same here...

http://news.orf.at/090319-36319/index.html (to be more spcific)

at the bottom, second link (non official NMHM-Blog)

Anonymous said...

another one that came through news.orf.at :)

Anonymous said...

yeah same link.... http://www.orf.at/090319-36319/index.html ....

lol.......

Anonymous said...

ORF.at!!!
THE BEST!!!

Anonymous said...

http://www.orf.at/090319-36319/index.html

is the link that came up just now.

Mike Rhode said...

Thank you all!

Kathleen Stocker said...

We're overwhelmed by the success of these pictures, really wonderfully overwhelmed. Thank you all.

Now, could I ask a favor? Would someone mind giving us a translation, even a loose one, of that news site?

Mike Rhode said...

Note that although the website put a copyright symbol on the pictures, they are in the public domain and may be used in any way one would like.

Nikolaus M said...

Army blocks website

The National Museum of Health and Medicin started a real monster-project. The museum wants to publicize his unique collection of war photographs from the american civil war to the vietnam war.

Since 2006 Mike Rhode and his employees already scanned in half a million pictures, picture by picture - 250.000 should be online this year. Some 800 pictures are online on Flickr.

Everyone shall see these pictures

Thanks to the tireless work of Rhode, these pictures that show the terrifying details of doctor's work in times of war.
"These pictures belong to everyone who pays taxes. And that's why everyone should be able to see them", Rhode tells wired.com

Unique pictures from the 2nd WW

The photographs show wounded soldiers, fatalities and clincal intrusions from the american civil war up to the vietnam war. Old x-ray pictures and daily life pictures are also shown.

A real highlight are rare photographs from the 2nd WW which Rhodes employee, Kathleen Stocker has already uploaded on flickr in thousands of hours of work. All pictures are marked with details about the pictured person.

Help from the community

Rhode and his colleagues also hope for help for their work after the publishment. In many pictures there's a lack of details about the people or the location of the picture. "Maybe a flickr user spots details and tells us more about that", hopes Rhode.

--------
I left out two minor paragraphs, hope you're still happy.

Greetings from Vienna

Anonymous said...

Here's a quick translation by me of the (long version of the) ORF article:

Army blocked website
500.000 recordings were digitized since 2006.

The American National Museum of Health and Medicine (NMHM) started a downright monster project. The museum wants to make its unique collection of medical war imagery, ranging from the American civil war to the Vietnam war, publicly available.

Since 2006, chief archiver Mike Rhode and his employees scanned half a million images piece-by-piece, 250.000 more are to follow this year. 800 images are already available via the online platform Flickr.

"Everybody should be able to see the images"
That the rare shots, revealing frightening details of the work of doctors in war times, are available world-wide is due to the sedulous work of Rhode. "The images are all tax-payers' property, so all should be able to see them.", Rhode reasons his motivation in Wired.com.


Army blocks Flickr
However, the work does not run smooth. Rhode's employer, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) which is subordinated to the Ministry of Defense, does not like the project too much.
"The army is not happy with that fact that people can also use the material for homepages that are not connected to the works themselves.", Rhode says.
Flickr and similar online platforms are blocked at the army. Rhode and his colleagues have to work mainly from home, which complicates their work, according to the online community Observers.

Rare recordings of World War 2
The recordings show wounded soldiers, dead, and simple medical surgery from the American civil war, World War 1, until the Vietnam war. Also old x-ray images of injuries and scenes of US soldiers' everyday lifeare shown.


A special highlight are rare recordings of World War 2 which were put online by Rhode's colleague Kathleen Stocker via Flickr in thousands of working hours. All images are tagged with known details of the shown persons.

Uploaded image by image
"We chose the hard way and uploaded image by image. Thereby we selected the best of thousands of the images we digitized in the last years.", Rhode says in the inofficial blog of the NMHM.


Help by the community
Rhode and his colleagues hope for support in their work as a result of the publications. Many images lack deeper information on the shown persons and the location they were shot at. "Maybe a Flickr-user recognizes details and can report more", Rhode hopes.

Anonymous said...

the same way:
http://www.orf.at/090319-36319/index.html

Anonymous said...

Jep... same link of the ORF http://www.orf.at/090319-36319/index.html
article on the project.

Anonymous said...

same source..
have to say, the photos are stunning and incredibly. i really think everyone should see this pictures!!

bettina said...

I also came here through www.orf.at

materthron said...

News item on orf.at (http://orf.at/090319-36319/index.html). Austria's public TV station

Kathleen Stocker said...

Thank you, Nikolaus and Anonymous. I appreciate the time you took to do that for us.

ticktockman said...

I've been reading the blog for over a year, via RSS feed, using livejournal to read the feed. I might have read about it in a community livejournal has to promote particular RSS feeds as they're added ... I'm not sure anymore.

The feed also inspired me to come with my family to the museum - we're in Silver Spring MD, and hadn't seen it before.

relationes said...

orf.at too. It must be very interesting by tracing back your visitors and find out, how news about your project spread around the world, at different dates in different countries.

Asc said...

Came here as well through http://orf.at/090319-36319/index.html

ORF is by far the biggest broadcasting station in Austria. Its news site has the biggest number of page hits per day and per year within the country. This article is currently the header on the front page.

jastner said...

orf.at

Anonymous said...

orf...

Anonymous said...

orf.at as well.

They quite often come up with interesting pieces of information. But these stay online for a short time only, of course. So the surge of interest should ebb by tomorrow.

brigitte

flow said...

same here - orf.at - thanx for sharing that part of history with the world! its horrible and beautiful at the same time and gives me chills, cheers!

Anonymous said...

hi,
i am from austria. i read about your projekt on orf.at

cu

Walter said...

Hi

have a look at that:
http://orf.at/090319-36319/index.html

People connecting expect to see gory pictures from the US army

Walter

Anonymous said...

orf.at, Austria's biggest news website (public service)

Anonymous said...

take a look.

http://orf.at/090319-36319/index.html

orf = austrian broadcasting agency.

Anonymous said...

Austria: little country, bit impact

Anonymous said...

orf.at too...

:-)

Anonymous said...

Correct, via the one of the most read austrian home pages www.orf.at

Anonymous said...

Link from Austrian Public Broadcasting Company
So you are getting a bunch of Austrians looking at your site.

Anonymous said...

austrian news site orf.at...

Anonymous said...

War. There is hardly any other subject that is so consequently obfuscated by military forces and governments around the globe and covered up with mendacious propaganda. So, I am interested in the facts; in truth, eventually. That is why i am interested in this material. Thanks for your work.

Anonymous said...

Here is one Austrian link to your Blog: http://www.orf.at/090319-36319/36320txt_story.html

This is the online service of the Austrian public TV and radio network.

Anonymous said...

found you on www.orf.at too.... :-)

Maggie said...

I'm one of the first 100. I do have a link to you on my page, but I don't believe I have a large readership. Nope, I don't know how I found you, but I stop in most every day. Glad you are here.

Anonymous said...

Found you also over the orf source. I do research on war blinded in austria WWI and WWII - - i hope you can continue with your work because it is important to show the world the impact of war

Kathleen Stocker said...

Thanks for responding, everyone. We're glad to hear from you!

Mundie-Art said...

Already aware of the museum, having visited there before - but found the blog while searching for something related to my own work: James G. Mundie's Cabinet of Curiosities (http://www.mundieart.com/cabinet/). Finding the blog content much to my liking, I couldn't help but subscribe. Incidentally, my own set of NMHM photos on Flickr is mighty popular with the Flickrati:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jgmundie/sets/72157600627429617/

Mike Rhode said...

Prof Mundie, thanks for the link - cool pictures! I put up a new post about your shots.